This is not ebay

We have entered into a bidding war with the other applicants. My recent foray into the world of online auctions has made me a little reckless when it comes to such matters and now I am feeling bidders remorse. This house had better be worth it. Big-P hasn’t even seen inside! What are we doing?

12 Responses to “This is not ebay”

  1. dbrownlock@yahoo.com

    Hmmm, I have that same problem on ebay. I get to the point where I say, “forget it! I’m not losing this item over a dollar!” Hehe. I hope it’s worth it, too. I’m sending energy your way! 🙂

  2. ben@neuronwave.com

    Well Done. Congratulations on getting the place and I’m sure its great, wonderful, ace and perfect for AJ to start running around in.

  3. merleb17@mac.com

    shhhh….such is the evil way of New York real estate (and many other places I suppose).All will be well…

  4. lara@larajayne.com

    Good luck Claire hope your bid blew the others out of the water. I’m sure Big P will love it when he sees inside, and you’ll be very happy. If not Paul says he can stay here!I know it will all workout for the best which ever way it goes.

  5. Ryegirl2@aol.com

    Bidding wars are common here on house sales. But for rentals, you might want to make sure it’s not just the work of a mercenary landlord. Best of luck!

  6. kellychilton@hotmail.com

    good luck! let us know what happens!

  7. dan@tubagooba.com

    Auctions are certainly legal in Australia, but they’re regulated in some fairly strict ways. My guess is that this “bidding war” (actually an auction with an informal title) should be subject to the same regulations, and that’s assuming that it’s legal in the first place. How do you know the estate agent is not just, like someone said, jacking up the price because they can see how keen you are? In a real auction, you’re required to see who you’re bidding against, and there are big fines if there are “dummy bidders”, to provide one example of a rule that almost certainly hasn’t been followed here.

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